Mary Magdalene

This article is about the biblical figure. For other uses, see Mary Magdalene (disambiguation).

Mary Magdalene

Domenico Tintoretto,
The Penitent Magdalene, c. 1598

Apostle to the Apostles

Born
(date unknown)
Magdala, Judea

Died
(date unknown)
Place: possibly Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, France, or Ephesus, Asia Minor [1]

Venerated in
Eastern Orthodox Church
Catholic Church
Anglican Communion
Lutheranism
other Protestant churches
Bahá’í Faith

Canonized
pre-Congregation

Feast
July 22

Attributes

Western: alabaster box of ointment
Eastern: container of ointment (as a myrrhbearer), or holding a red egg (symbol of the resurrection); embracing the feet of Christ after the Resurrection

Patronage
Apothecaries; Kawit, Cavite; Atrani, Italy; Casamicciola Terme, Ischia; contemplative life; converts; glove makers; hairdressers; penitent sinners; people ridiculed for their piety; perfumeries; pharmacists; sexual temptation; tanners; women

Mary Magdalene (/ˈmæɡdələn/ Hebrew: מרים המגדלית‎‎, original Biblical Greek: Μαρία ἡ Μαγδαληνή),[2] literally translated as Mary the Magdalene or Mary of Magdala, is a figure in Christianity who, according to the Bible, traveled with Jesus as one of his followers. She is said to have witnessed Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection.[3] Within the four Gospels she is named at least 12 times,[4] more than most of the apostles. Based on texts of the early Christian era in the third century, it seems that her status as an “apostle” rivals even Peter’s.[5][unreliable source?]
The Gospel of Luke says seven demons had gone out of her,[Lk. 8:2] and the longer ending of Mark says Jesus had cast seven demons out of her.[Mk. 16:9] She is most prominent in the narrative of the crucifixion of Jesus, at which she was present. She was also present two days later, immediately following the sabbath,[3] when, according to all four canonical Gospels,[Matthew 28:1–8] [Mark 16:9–10] [Luke 24:10] [John 20:18] she was, either alone or as a member of a group of women, the first to testify to the resurrection of Jesus.[6] John 20 and Mark 16:9 specifically name her as the first person to see Jesus after his resurrection.
Ideas that go beyond the gospel presentation of Mary Magdalene as a prominent representative of the women who followed Jesus have been put forward over the centuries.[3][4][7]
Mary Magdalene is considered to be a saint by the Catholic, Eastern
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